The Clinton Herald, Clinton, Iowa

December 13, 2013

Legal marijuana sales will be spotty in Colorado


Associated Press

---- — DENVER (AP) — Legal marijuana sales in Colorado are set to start on Jan. 1, or so the law says. Knowing when the recreational pot shops will actually open, however, is anyone’s guess.

The state’s 160 hopeful pot shops are so mired in red tape and confusion that no one knows yet when or if they’ll be allowed to open.

Not a single shop will clear state and local licensing requirements until about Dec. 27.

“There’s a perception that come Jan. 1, Colorado’s going to be like Wal-Mart on Black Friday, people pouring through the doors. Not going to happen,” said Mike Elliott, spokesman for the state’s Medical Marijuana Industry Group.

Even as so-called ganjapreneurs are expanding operations, pouring concrete and planning tentative grand openings, they’re still navigating a maze of regulations. Many of the applicants are still waiting on inspections, local zoning hearings and background checks before finding out whether they’ve been approved to open their doors to adults over 21.

“There might be a lot of disappointed people on New Year’s Day,” Elliott said.

Some of the largest potential new retail pot towns — Aspen, Aurora and Boulder — have already announced they won’t have permitting red tape cleared by Jan. 1. Marijuana tourism companies that already lead bring-your-own pot tours in Colorado are putting off new trips, unsure where they’d bring tourists looking to buy legal pot, not just smoke it.

Even in towns hoping to have at least a shop or two open, such as Breckenridge and Telluride, there will be no 12:01 a.m. pot sales. Like liquor stores, marijuana shops have mandated opening hours, not before 8 a.m. anywhere in Colorado.

The regulatory delays are testing the patience of many in the industry.

Ryan Cook, general manager of one of the state’s largest marijuana businesses, a chain of stores called The Clinic, is spending his days not prepping a grand opening plan but going to Denver’s zoning, planning and fire departments to check on permits.

Cook recently counted out more than $1,400 in cash for some permits from the Denver Fire Department. He was then told he needs another permit for a new machine he acquired to produce marijuana extracts, a $50,000 contraption obtained specifically to comply with new safety guidance from the Fire Department itself.

“You guys have put me through the ringer,” Cook joked after picking up the permits, just part of some $300,000 in various permit and license fees The Clinic’s six shops will pay to various state and local agencies this year.