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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Thursday there's been a five-fold increase of cases of a new strain of swine flu that spreads from pigs to people.

What’s in a name? Everything if you’re a pork producer and the name of the newest health scare makes people think twice about eating bacon.

The fast rise in the number of people diagnosed with the so-called “swine flu” over the last week has sent pork futures tumbling and re-awakened bad memories of the 2009 flu pandemic bearing the same name.

Health officials have gone to great lengths to call the new bug by a more official name, the variant influenza A (H3N2v), and to tell people it’s safe to eat pork.

But the people who make their living raising and selling hogs fear it’s the other label that will stick, pointing to headlines that read: “Swine flu cases surge.”

“It’s amazing the impact of a name,” said Mike Platt, executive director of the Indiana Pork Producers Association. “It’s all about labeling and perception.”

Indiana is the epicenter of what appears to be a new flu strain that’s been dubbed the “swine flu” for a reason. It has the largest number of confirmed human cases in the U.S as of Thursday, at 120; and state health officials said all of those people infected with the bug got it from handling sick pigs.

The Centers for Disease Control calls the variant influenza A (H3N2v) a “swine virus,” meaning it's yet to be detected as being passed from human to human — though it could be soon.

The CDC also said this new flu strand carries genetic similarities to the first “swine flu” — the H1N1 virus that sickened hundreds of thousands globally in 2009 and plunged the U.S. pork industry into a financial crisis when people stopped eating pork.

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Details for this story were provided by Maureen Hayden

of the CNHI Statehouse Bureau in Indianapolis.