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National News

April 17, 2014

Court to weigh challenge to ban

WASHINGTON (AP) — As political campaigns begin to heat up, the Supreme Court is deciding whether false accusations and mudslinging made during an election can be punished as a crime.

Addressing an issue of negative campaigning that now may be a fact of life in American politics, justices will consider a challenge to an Ohio law that bars false statements about political candidates. The case being heard next week has attracted national attention, with least 15 other states having similar laws.

Groups across the political spectrum are criticizing the law as a restriction on the First Amendment right to free speech.

Even Ohio’s attorney general, Republican Mike DeWine, says he has serious concerns about the law. His office filed two briefs in the case, one from staff lawyers obligated to defend the state and another expressing DeWine’s personal view that the law “may chill constitutionally protected political speech.”

“The thing we see time and time again in political campaigns is that candidates use the law to game the system by filing a complaint,” DeWine said in an interview with The Associated Press.

In an attempt at humor, satirist P.J. O’Rourke and the libertarian Cato Institute filed a widely circulated brief ridiculing the law and defending political smear tactics as a cornerstone of American democracy.

O’Rourke’s brief celebrates a history of dubious campaign remarks including President Richard Nixon’s “I am not a crook,” President George H.W. Bush’s “Read my lips: no new taxes!” and President Barack Obama’s “If you like your health care plan, you can keep it.”

The Ohio law makes it illegal to knowingly or recklessly make false statements about a candidate during an election. The high court is not expected to rule directly on the constitutional issue, instead focusing on the narrower question of whether the law can be challenged before it is actually enforced.

The case began during the 2010 election, when the Susan B. Anthony List, an anti-abortion group, planned to launch a billboard campaign accusing then-Democratic Rep. Steven Driehaus of supporting taxpayer-funded abortion because he backed President Barack Obama’s health care overhaul.

Driehaus urged the Ohio Elections Commission to block the ads, arguing that the proposed billboard was false under Ohio law.

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