The Clinton Herald, Clinton, Iowa

National News

June 29, 2012

10 Things to Know for Friday

CLINTON —

Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about today.

1. WHAT THE HEALTH CARE LAW MEANS FOR YOU

Free vaccines for kids, cheaper drugs for the elderly and many other benefits of Obama's upheld law are already out there. More are coming, like a guaranteed right to buy health insurance even for patients with serious medical troubles.

2. EU SUMMIT BREAKTHROUGH CITED

After tough all-night bargaining, European leaders appear to salvage what had seemed to be a summit teetering toward failure by agreeing to funnel money directly to struggling banks, and in the longer term to form a tighter union.

3. CORPORATE CYBERCRIME OFTEN GOES UNDERREPORTED

Hackers broke into computers at hotel giant Wyndham three times in two years and stole credit card information belonging to hundreds of thousands of customers. Wyndham didn't report the break-in in corporate filings even though the SEC wants companies to inform investors.

4. OBAMA HEADS TO SWING STATE DEVASTATED BY WILDFIRES

The president arrives in Colorado at 12:55 p.m. to survey damage from the state's worst fires in a decade.

5. CLINTON TO MEET WITH RUSSIAN COUNTERPART

The secretary of state has a midday meeting in St. Petersburg, Russia, with the foreign minister before a dozen nations meet Saturday in Geneva to discuss the next steps involving violence-wracked Syria.

6. ZIMMERMAN GETS ANOTHER BOND HEARING

At 8:30 a.m., a Florida judge will weigh several factors in deciding whether to set a second bond for the neighborhood watch leader who fatally shot Trayvon Martin.

7. NOW IT'S MADOFF'S YOUNGER BROTHER'S TURN

Peter Madoff, 66, the brother of a man who became an icon for financial crime after the economy collapsed in 2008, is poised to plead guilty to criminal charges at an 10 a.m. proceeding.

8. CONGRESS TO TACKLE KEY BILLS

Lawmakers are poised to vote on a massive legislative package that overhauls highway and transit programs, salvages an estimated 3 million jobs and spares millions of students from higher interest rates on college loans.

9. TANK-DRIVING FANTASY BECOMES REALITY

Some drivers are flocking to a remote spot in Minnesota to turn the frustration of being stuck in traffic into metal-crunching reality. For as little as $399, you can pilot surplus military tanks and other armored vehicles around old limestone quarry.

10. AND WITH THE FIRST PICK IN THE NBA DRAFT

The New Orleans Hornets selected Anthony Davis, a freshman forward from the national champion Kentucky Wildcats. His teammate, Michael Kidd-Gilchrist, went No. 2 to Charlotte.

 

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