The Clinton Herald, Clinton, Iowa

National News

May 6, 2014

Former nuke officer reprimanded in gambling case

WASHINGTON — The Navy admiral fired last fall as the No. 2 commander of U.S. nuclear forces was given a letter of reprimand Monday and ordered to forfeit $4,000 in pay but will be allowed to remain on duty as a Navy staff officer, the Navy said.

In a brief statement, the Navy said a superior officer determined that Rear Adm. Timothy Giardina's involvement in a casino gambling case violated the Uniform Code of Military Justice on two counts of conduct unbecoming an officer and a gentleman.

The first count involved Giardina lying to an investigator and the second related to his failure to surrender — and his subsequent use of — counterfeit poker chips that he claimed he had found at the casino, the Navy said.

Giardina accepted the so-called non-judicial punishment from Adm. Bill Gortney rather than exercising his option to challenge it by requesting a court martial.

The casino matter was investigated by the Naval Criminal Investigative Service, which was unable to determine with certainty how Giardina came into possession of the phony chips. He acknowledged using three $500 chips which were subsequently discovered by casino officials to have been counterfeit.

At the time of the incident at the Horseshoe Casino in Council Bluffs, Iowa, Giardina was deputy commander of U.S. Strategic Command in Omaha, Neb., which is responsible for the full arsenal of U.S. nuclear weapons.

He is the second senior officer with responsibility for nuclear weapons to be fired in recent months; the other was Air Force Maj. Gen. Michael Carey, who was commander of the land-based nuclear missile corps when he was relieved of duty last October after an alcohol-fueled episode in Russia last July.

In April, the Air Force announced that Carey would retire June 1 at the rank of brigadier general.

Together the Giardina and Carey firings stirred questions about the quality of the military's nuclear leadership, particularly in the case of the Air Force, which also has suffered a series of missteps in training, security and inspections. In November, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel expressed concern about nuclear leadership lapses, and in January he ordered a broad review of nuclear forces.

Text Only
National News
  • Brother sues W.Va. senator over business loan

    U.S. Sen. Joe Manchin III faces a $1.7 million civil suit filed by a brother over a lifeline to save a family carpet business.

    July 25, 2014

  • Official: Hospital gunman intended to kill others

    A psychiatric patient ranted about a hospital gun ban before opening fire at the suburban medical complex, killing his caseworker and grazing his psychiatrist before the doctor pulled out his own weapon and fired back, authorities said Friday.

    July 25, 2014

  • 10 things to know for today

    Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about today:

     

    July 25, 2014

  • Illinois woman, 47, dies rescuing boy in Wisc. lake ARLINGTON HEIGHTS, Ill. (AP) — Friends and family are mourning the death of an Illinois woman who drowned while rescuing a 9-year-old boy in a Wisconsin lake.The (Arlington Heights) Daily Herald reports 47-year-old Karen Wessel of Arlington Heights d

    July 25, 2014

  • Taiwan plane crash photo Air travel a leap of faith for passengers WASHINGTON (AP) — Airline travel requires passengers to make a leap of faith, entrusting their lives to pilots, airlines, air traffic controllers and others who regulate air travel.Even after a week of multiple tragedies in worldwide aviation, “There

    July 25, 2014 1 Photo

  • Arizona's prolonged lethal injection is fourth in U.S. this year

    Arizona's execution of double-murderer Joseph Wood marked the fourth time this year that a state failed to dispatch a convict efficiently, according to the Constitution Project, a bipartisan legal group.3

    July 24, 2014

  • 10 things to know for today

    Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about today:

     

    July 24, 2014

  • U.S. economy, though sluggish, may now be sturdier WASHINGTON (AP) — Out of a seemingly hollow recovery from the Great Recession, a more durable if still slow-growing U.S. economy has emerged.That conclusion, one held by a growing number of economists, might surprise many people. After all, in the fi

    July 24, 2014

  • FAA lifts ban on U.S. flights to Tel Aviv WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Aviation Administration has lifted its ban on U.S. flights in and out of Israel, which the agency had imposed out of concern for the risk of planes being hit by Hamas rockets.The decision was effective at 11:45 p.m. EDT

    July 24, 2014

  • Memorial honoring injured vets underway WASHINGTON (AP) — Army Lt. Dawn Halfaker was on patrol 10 years ago in Baqubah, Iraq, when a rocket-propelled grenade tore through her military vehicle and exploded inside.When she woke up from a coma, the West Point graduate found out her right arm

    July 24, 2014

AP Video
Facebook