The Clinton Herald, Clinton, Iowa

December 9, 2013

Storm dumps snow on East Coast, travel dicey

DAN GELSTON Associated Press MICHAEL RUBINKAM Associated Press
The Clinton Herald

---- — PHILADELPHIA — A plodding storm that dumped heavy snow on the unsuspecting Mid-Atlantic region threatened to make roads dicey in the northeast corridor for today’s commute while travel disruptions continued to ripple across the country days after the same system first began wreaking havoc in the skies.

The seemingly never-ending storm that coated parts of Texas in ice struck with unexpected force on the East Coast, blanketing some spots in a foot of snow and grinding highways to a halt.

Travel problems could linger into this afternoon, with freezing rain and icy conditions sticking around as wintry weather stretched from Missouri to Maine.

The storm canceled more than 2,500 flights Sunday and delayed thousands more, according to estimates from the website Flightaware.com. More than 1,000 of today’s flights were already canceled, the greatest share from Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport, which was still reeling from the effects of the ice storm that brought North Texas to a standstill.

The forecast for today remained up in the air for the northeast, depending on how quickly the system moves and temperatures rise, according to the National Weather Service. Meanwhile, a winter storm warning was in effect until 10 a.m. for Washington, D.C., and Baltimore where up to a quarter inch of ice was expected because of freezing rain that could cause power outages.

The expectation was for another weather system moving out of Virginia to follow the same path as Sunday’s storm overnight. It was expected to dump icy drizzle and eventually freezing rain through the New York City area and into Boston, National Weather Service meteorologist Greg Heavener said.

Indeed, slippery conditions were reported overnight in the New York City area: a crash involving about 20 vehicles closed southbound lanes of Interstate 95 in Greenwich, Conn., for a couple of hours. No serious injuries were immediately reported.

Forecasters said air travel would likely remain a hassle, too.

“I think the further north you look, departures and arrivals could be affected because of icy issues,” Heavener said.

What was forecast in the Philadelphia area to be a tame storm system with about an inch of snow gradually changing over to rain mushroomed into a full-blown snow storm. Bands of heavy snow made for a wide range of accumulation: a foot was reported in Newark, Del. Philadelphia International Airport received 8.6 inches.