The Clinton Herald, Clinton, Iowa

National News

July 23, 2012

10 Things to Know for Monday

CLINTON — Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about today.

1. "DARK KNIGHT" MASSACRE SUSPECT IN COURT

James Holmes, accused of slaying 12 moviegoers in a suburban Denver theater during opening night of the new Batman movie, is slated to make his first court appearance at 10:30 a.m.

2. MOVIEGOERS JITTERY BUT UNDETERRED

As moviegoers returned to theaters, the AP's Jocelyn Noveck found that some Batman fans preferred a back-row seat or glanced to see what security was in place, but were determined to look beyond the horrific shooting in Aurora, Colo.

3. WHAT'S IN STORE FOR PENN STATE

At 8 a.m., the NCAA will announce what are expected to be severe sanctions on the Nittany Lions' football program and university.

4. NOT ALL AGREE ON KIDS' CHOLESTEROL TESTS

Doctors are still debating the question months after a government-appointed panel recommended widespread screening that would lead to prescribing medicine for some children.

5. CANDIDATES BACK ON THE STUMP

Obama speaks at the National Convention of the Veterans of Foreign Wars in Reno, Nev., at 2:35 p.m. and Romney holds a small business round table in Costa Mesa, Calif., at 12:30 p.m.

6. DEADLY DAY IN IRAQ WORST IN 2012

A wave of bombings kills scores in Iraq, just days after an al-Qaida leader warned that the militant group is regrouping there.

7. LONG-DELAYED TRIAL FOR DREW PETERSON BEGINS

At 9 a.m., jury selection gets under way in the trial of the former suburban Chicago police officer charged with drowning his third wife, Kathleen Savio, in 2004. He's also a suspect in the 2007 disappearance of his fourth wife, Stacy Peterson.

8. SINISTER. DISTURBING. CREEPY. FRIGHTENING

The official mascots of London's Olympic Games — Wenlock and Mandeville — have been called all those things, but organizers are hoping to tack on a more positive title: merchandising magic.

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