The Clinton Herald, Clinton, Iowa

National News

October 5, 2013

Shutdown ruins vacations, hurts local economies

FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. — Stop at a cafe in the remote stretches of northern Arizona and southern Utah in the fall, and you’re likely to hear a mix of languages as tourists from around the world step into the iconic western landscape, marked by breathtaking canyons and massive rock formations.

Millions of visitors tour the region each year for what can be once-in-a-lifetime vacations.

Those visitors didn’t stop with the government shutdown, which forced officials to close down roads, campgrounds and tourist centers at national parks dotting the landscape.

Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer has offered to use state money to keep the Grand Canyon open, and several businesses made similar pledges — all of which have been politely rejected by the national park.

The impact isn’t just ruining vacations. It also has brought local economies to a near standstill.

THUMBS DOWN

Outside Yellowstone’s north entrance, two men on a bus with Indian and Chinese passengers frown and give the thumbs down sign after seeing the park is shut down. A family of Japanese tourists leaves the Grand Canyon in tears. An English couple and a Belgium couple touring national parks out West settle for a drive around Yosemite without being able to put their feet on the ground.

”Looks as though both sides are having a bit of a childish tantrum,” says Englishman Neil Stanton.

Songyi Cho, on a separate trip to Yosemite, says: “This is crazy. How can a whole government shut down?”

While some international tourists kept tabs on American politics in the days before they ventured to national parks, others were blindsided.

Alan Platt and his wife, Leana, first heard about a possible shutdown while at the Grand Canyon on Monday. Platt guessed that lawmakers would be pushed to the brink but pass a budget by the deadline. He was wrong, and the couple was forced to cut their three-day Grand Canyon stay short.

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