The Clinton Herald, Clinton, Iowa

National News

National News
  • Attorney: Stabbing rampage came out of nowhere

    The 16-year-old boy charged in a stabbing spree at a high school outside Pittsburgh was not troubled and his family didn't see any sign that he was capable of violence, his attorney said Thursday, deepening the mystery over what prompted the rampage that injured 21 students and a security guard.

    Alex Hribal did not have a history of mental illness, defense attorney Patrick Thomassey said, adding that he's not aware that the slender, dark-haired boy had been bullied, either.

    April 10, 2014

  • Reflecting on progress, Obama honors civil rights

    Barack Obama was 2 years old when Lyndon Baines Johnson sat in the East Room of the White House with Martin Luther King Jr. and signed the Civil Rights Act, putting an end to an America where schools, restaurants and water fountains were divided by race. Half a century later, the first black man to become president is commemorating what's been accomplished in his lifetime and recommitting the nation to fighting deep inequalities that remain.

    April 10, 2014

  • Senate hopeful Brown: Health law costs liberty

    Hoping to return to Washington by way of New Hampshire, former Massachusetts Sen. Scott Brown is using a variation of the state's "Live Free or Die" motto to argue against President Barack Obama's health care overhaul law.

    Brown planned to formally announce his Senate bid Thursday night. In excerpts of remarks provided by his campaign, he said the health care law forces people to "live free or log on."

    April 10, 2014

  • 10 Things to Know for Today

    Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about today:

    April 10, 2014

  • Most wild kittens taken to shelters will be killed LOS ANGELES -- Wild kittens that will number in the tens of millions this year are starting to be born, but half of them won't survive, an especially acute problem at overtaxed shelters forced to euthanize the millions they receive. It's a grim reali

    April 10, 2014

  • What you need to know about the Heartbleed bug

    Millions of passwords, credit card numbers and other personal information may be at risk as a result of a major breakdown in Internet security revealed earlier this week.

    The damage caused by the "Heartbleed" bug is currently unknown. The security hole exists on a vast number of the Internet's Web servers and went undetected for more than two years. While it's conceivable that the flaw was never discovered by hackers, it's nearly impossible to tell.

    April 9, 2014

  • 2012_Mazda6_--_NHTSA.jpg Brakes, steering and...spiders? What's behind the latest auto recalls

    11 million vehicles have already been recalled in 2014 for everything from power steering failure to vulnerability to spider attack.

    Check out the full list of 2014 recalls.

    April 9, 2014 1 Photo

  • Reprising grim role, Obama grieves at Fort Hood

    Returning again to a grief-stricken corner of America, President Barack Obama is reprising his role as chief comforter, mourning with families of those killed last week at Fort Hood and offering solace to the nation.

    It's a duty Obama has had to fulfill far too often.

    Tucson. Aurora. Newtown. Boston. Washington Navy Yard. Fort Hood — twice.

    April 9, 2014

  • Northwestern QB says union push was rushed, wrong

    Northwestern's Trevor Siemian says it was wrong for former quarterback Kain Colter and other players to explore unionization without first taking their concerns to their coach and administrators.

    A regional director for the National Labor Relations Board has cleared the way for Northwestern's scholarship football players to vote April 25 on whether to form what would be the nation's first union for college athletes. Coach Pat Fitzgerald has told his players to vote against the union.

    April 9, 2014

  • Smartphone trial judge annoyed by phones in court

    So far one of the biggest problems for a federal judge overseeing a patent battle between the world's largest smartphone makers isn't about stolen ideas. It's getting the roomful of smartphone devotees to turn off their devices.

    U.S. District Judge Lucy Koh has become increasingly frustrated during the first few days of the trial pitting Apple against Samsung because the many personal Wi-Fi signals interfere with a network the judge relies on for a real-time transcript of the proceedings.

    April 9, 2014

AP Video
Facebook