The Clinton Herald, Clinton, Iowa

Top News

July 17, 2013

Second-hand smoke can harm your pet

(Continued)

CLINTON —

We all know that smoking is bad for our health, but what might surprise many pet-owners are the dangerous effects that same smoke can have on their four-legged loved ones.

“There are studies that show that dogs exposed to large amounts of second-hand smoke have significant changes to their lung tissue over time,” said Heather Wilson-Robles, assistant professor at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Science (CVM). “These changes range from fibrosis, or scarring of the lung tissue to precancerous and even cancerous lesions.”

A case report published in 2012 showed a cat developing a tracheal carcinoma after being exposed to large amounts of second-hand smoke in the home, and another study in 2002, published by the group at Tufts, showed that second-hand smoke may double the risk of lymphoma development in cats.

Many veterinarians also feel that symptoms in their patients with respiratory diseases such as asthma or bronchitis improve if their owners quit smoking. For those that do smoke, there are a few ways to tell if your habit is affecting your pet’s health.

“For animals with asthma, allergic lung disease, or bronchitis you might see a dry hacking and progressive cough,” said Wilson-Robles. “Asthma patients may have more frequent asthma attacks and their symptoms may be more difficult to manage medically. Animals with allergic lung disease will often have more severe symptoms if they live in a smoking household and these symptoms may persist all year round rather than being seasonal.”

Disposing of your tobacco may also prove hazardous to the wellbeing of your pet if they tend to be nosy or like to dig in the trash. “Ingestion of tobacco products may cause gastrointestinal upset such as vomiting, diarrhea, drooling, increased salivation and trembling,” said Wilson-Robles. “High doses of nicotine may lead to excitement, constricted pupils, odd behavior, seizures and even death. Cigarette butts are especially dangerous as they contain 25 percent  of the nicotine found in the cigarette.”

While the most efficient way to treat second-hand tobacco problems with your pet is for the owner to quit using the substance, there are other ways to keep your pet safe and keep your habit.

“Pet-owners need to immediately quit smoking around the animal and wash their hands thoroughly after smoking before touching the pet or anything it may come in contact with,” said Wilson-Robles. "If your dog or cat eats a cigarette, chewing tobacco, cigar, etc. call an emergency clinic nearby for directions on how to treat this toxicosis. In most cases the tobacco will induce vomiting by itself, but if not, vomiting should be induced to clean the stomach out and prevent systemic and possibly even lethal nicotine toxicosis.”

If you believe your pet is suffering from tobacco-related issues of any kind schedule an appointment with your local veterinarian immediately.

Pet Talk is a service of the College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University.

 

Text Only
Top News
  • Fist bump photo Study: Fist bumps less germy than handshakes

    When it comes to preventing the spread of germs, maybe the president is on to something with his fondness for fist bumps.

    July 30, 2014 1 Photo

  • Sharknado.jpg Sharknado 2 set to attack viewers tonight

    In the face of another "Sharknado" TV movie (the even-more-inane "Sharknado 2: The Second One," premiering Wednesday night on Syfy), there isn't much for a critic to say except to echo what the characters themselves so frequently scream when confronted by a great white shark spinning toward them in a funnel cloud:
    "LOOK OUT!!"

    July 30, 2014 1 Photo

  • Rodden, Danny.jpg Indiana sheriff accused of lying about relationship with prostitute

    The sheriff of Clark County, Ind., faces an eight-count federal indictment that accuses him of lying about paying a prostitute for a sex act and giving her a badge so that she could claim a discount rate at a hotel.

    July 30, 2014 1 Photo

  • Clinton judge hears motion to suppress in drug case

    District Court Judge Stuart Werling will consider a motion of suppression against a warrant that led to the arrest of a Clinton man on drug charges.

    July 30, 2014

  • David Johnson Clinton grad, NDSU picked to lead MVC

     David Johnson, the former Clinton High standout now entering his senior season at the University of Northern Iowa, was named to the preseason All-Missouri Valley Football Conference first team that was announced Tuesday.

    July 30, 2014 1 Photo

  • School supplies offered at events

    With students going back to school soon, Clinton families will have two opportunities to receive free back-to-school supplies.

    July 30, 2014

  • Showboat follies Iafrate set to leave Showboat Theatre

    As the summer season nears its end, the Clinton Area Showboat Theatre on Tuesday honored the past and said hello to the future.

    July 30, 2014 1 Photo

  • Sidewinders photo Debating decibels: Finally Fridays, Showboat at odds over concert volume

    Two events will take center stage at the riverfront Friday. And if it’s anything like the last time these entities shared the same evening, both crowds may want to take note of the decibel levels coming from the bandshell.

    July 30, 2014 1 Photo

  • wd saturday tobias .jpg Stranger’s generosity stuns Ohio veteran

    Vietnam War veteran David A. Tobias was overwhelmed recently when a fellow customer at an OfficeMax store near Ashtabula, Ohio paid for a computer he was purchasing.

    July 29, 2014 1 Photo

  • 20140727-AMX-GUNS271.jpg Beretta, other gun makers heading to friendlier states

    In moving south and taking 160 jobs with it, Beretta joins several other prominent gunmakers abandoning liberal states that passed tough gun laws after the Newtown shooting.

    July 29, 2014 1 Photo

AP Video