The Clinton Herald, Clinton, Iowa

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July 8, 2013

MIA work is 'acutely dysfunctional'

(Continued)

The Russian government has repeatedly denied it received American POWs from Korea.

Accounting for the nation’s war dead has been a politically charged issue for decades. The debate is not about the practicality of the mission, which some might question, but how it should be pursued.

Sometimes overlooked amid the squabbling is the emotional toll on the families of the missing. They are often bewildered by the bureaucracy and left to watch hope wear away with the passage of time.

In 1975, more than two decades after Pfc. Kenneth F. Reese was declared missing in Korea, his widow, Chris Tench, who had by then remarried, described her feelings in her local newspaper, the Gastonia (N.C) Gazette.

She wrote that initially she was relieved to realize that the policeman who delivered the news about Reese on Dec. 18, 1950, was saying that her husband was missing, not dead. He might turn up alive, she recalled thinking.

Later she thought differently.

“No, missing isn’t dead,” she wrote. “It’s worse than dead.”

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