The Clinton Herald, Clinton, Iowa

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November 9, 2013

A 'little' literary movement

(Continued)

Bol and Brooks credit the people most responsible for the success of the movement as the "early adopters," or the first people to purchase and plant the libraries and become stewards of the Little Free Library mission: to promote a sense of community, reading for children, literacy for adults and libraries around the world.

People who want to set up a Little Free Library can go about it in several ways: building their own, ordering one from the non-profit organization or sponsoring one for a community in need.

The Becerras and Underwood went with the former.

The Becerra's white wooden structure decorated with colorful animal stickers sits in their front yard waiting for eager readers.

Three weeks ago, Ines received her official charter sign, making the library a part of the Little Free Library network. Evidence of the Becerra's project made the Little Free Library map around the same time, with a small yellow house icon designating the library's location.

About 35 children's books fill the Becerra's Little Free Library, though Ines plans to add more for children up to age 12 to enjoy. She also will add more holiday and winter-themed books as the season approaches.

In the three weeks since her library opened for business, Becerra has seen a handful of visitors and a few new books. Although she hopes more will peruse and select books, she's elated by every visitor.

"I love it. It's really neat to see the kids looking to see what they can find," Ines said. "It's always a surprise what you're going to get."

Underwood's son built the library as a Mother's Day present, putting it up this year. The library outside Underwood's home is wooden with two levels and glass doors. She soon filled it with adult and children's books, which have been read, returned or replaced by readers young and old.

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