The Clinton Herald, Clinton, Iowa

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November 27, 2012

Legislators, school leaders look toward the future

State officials meet with school board to talk about legislative issues affecting districts

CLINTON — Members of the Clinton School Board and recently elected state legislators discussed the pending loss of social services, enrollment changes, property tax reform and other issues affecting the Clinton School District during the board’s Monday night meeting.  

State Representative Mary Wolfe, D-Clinton, who was elected for her second term earlier this month and Freshman State Senator Rita Hart, D-Wheatland, learned what they can do for the students of the Clinton School District during their upcoming terms in the state legislature.

Among the items they discussed were the potential loss of mental health services and victims services, both of which have been altered at the state level.  

Superintendent Deb Olson stressed how intertwined the services are with the school system and how essential the services are to keeping families in he community,  

“We are totally involved with social agencies,” Olson said.

Wolfe said the meeting with the Attorney General Office’s Crime Victims Assistance Division staff that occurred in October to discuss the changes to the way victim services are administered in the state was productive.

“I really feel like they learned about this community,” Wolfe said.

She also said after communicating with Eric Tabor, the Chief of Staff for the Iowa Attorney General, she believes a year of funding would be available for agencies that will possibly be affected by the changes.  

Olson also asked for continued funding for the preschool program, which Wolfe indicated during campaigning that she was in favor of.  

Hart, who was a teacher for many years, said she would work to represent the needs of the district and the students as she serves her first term in the newly created Senate District 49.  

Among the other items discussed by board members and legislators were property tax and education reform and some of the frustrations caused by state funding, including allowable growth.  

The legislators and board members agreed to maintain open lines of communication.

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